Itinerant Mind Archived

40+ hours of archived Itinerant Mind broadcasts (2016 – now) at Wave Farm WGXC90.7fm … the sound of artists 16,846 kilometres apart improvising through a wire.

Since February 2016 we’ve been producing at least an hour of recorded material for broadcast on Wave Farm. But generating a lot more material each month has gone into  the making of that one hour broadcast each month.

Listening back to the archive is an interesting reflective act. Pick a random month and settle in for some deep listening.

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Brittle

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Our output as artists and in particular presenters on Wave Farm depends on regular long form improvisations to which we have dedicated a considerable amount of time over recent months. We’ve consciously stripped back our instrumentation to just sax and guitar with none of our usual use of field recordings, electronics or code. Itinerant Mind this month epitomizes this. Comprised of edited parts of four improvisations that together extend over four and a half hours this mix is high pitched and intense…kind of “brittle” in it’s sonic qualities. A word used to describe our sound in a recent WIRE review.

Add emotion and moisture to the telematic and you are in the territory of the technoetic…

We were joined again this month by guitarist Ross Oliver for “Morning/Nite” a live hour of improvised and distributed sonic exploration. Itinerant Mind in April was a live improvisation directly referencing our influences including Bachalard’s view of time, producing a work composed of paradoxical, disrupted and unrepeated sounds juxtaposed in a triangulated and tangled engagement. Tune into WGXC 90.7 FM Wave Farm at 11:00am each month on the first Saturday morning US Eastern time. https://wavefarm.org/wgxc/schedule/y1e2ta

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It’s after two o’clock in the morning when I get offline – around 5:00pm in the UK, and 12:00pm the previous day in New York. The last thing I’d said was “I’m going to bed…” I feel strange. Not much I had planned meticulously over the previous days had played out. The samples and midi files I had tweeked responding to the agreed improvisational concept hadn’t felt or sounded the how I intended in the telematic swirl of our Wave Farm broadcast. What I’d heard as bells were manifested as string-like, the pianos shrill, not jazzy (brittle they said in a recent WIRE Review). The field recordings I typically use as textures seemed to be drowned out. The mix was chaotic and the screeching feedback inherent in our live work was there for much of the performance. The space I imagined leaving for the other performers had been replaced with an ambiguous noise I couldn’t yet decipher. Annie and Ross’s enthusiasm for what had transpired was puzzling. As we finished Annie had said it was one of our best performance. She liked the ways we’d listened to each other. What had they heard that I didn’t? A viable space must have been there I tell myself. We weren’t playing blindly, each isolated in our own bubble. As we’d played I felt in turn, a relaxed “go with the flow” vibe, anxious as things unfolded, focused as we struggled to reach some kind of sonic consensus that visited fleetingly as we progressed through the two hours online – then finally I let go – it was ok whatever transpired. At some points it all seemed to gel – like just prior to going live and then again at the very end, but as the broadcast had progressed the chaos reigned … normal for improvisers I tell myself…normal…but there is nothing normal about this space, this tangled engagement … the sound of artists 16,846 km communicating in real time through sound and deep listening.

Listen for yourself here…

Outward [Noise]

Listen back to Outward [Noise] our March edition of Itinerant Mind on Wave Farm, WGXC 90.7-FM, Greene and Columbia County community radio @mixlr . Annie and I played with artist Ross Oliver and it was a really enjoyable jam. This is a recording of the broadcast plus the set up for the show.

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We were also recently enlisted as part of the seminar “Interruptions: Disruptive discourses in screen, sound and photography” at London College of Communications (LCCLondon) on the 7th of March as part of Research Fortnight.

Our presentation and telematic performance discussed and demonstrated the building of structured assemblages of experimental sound and music that underpin the ongoing testing of telematic ecologies of improvisation and collaborative composition as a means to generate newness and new sonic spaces. The image (above) is from our friend Lee Campbell.

London: Tales of dark alleyways and endless bus journeys…and flights of fancy on the tube.

We completed up our year long project “The Grid” with a soundscape totally comprised of recordings related to London created by Annie Morrad. Broadcast on Wave Farm This brings to a close the work we embarked upon for Project Anywhere.

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Image: Annie Morrad (London)

This recording is taken from a year long exploration into the underbelly of a city. The intention was to investigate intriguing aspects of the city through journeys interspersed with chat. This focuses on the minutia and moments that happen whilst on the move including falling in love with strangers, tripping over unseen crisp packets, being shadowed by your own shadow, and popping into new venues. The voices heard are from Craig Clayton, Chila Kumari Burman, Mike Summer and Josie Monro and the general background London voices. The people interviewed represent the fabric of the city interwoven into the day to day adventure that makes up London.

More information about Project Anywhere can be found here: projectanywhere.net

Telematic Improvisation and AI

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We use Mixlr and Skype for our live broadcasts via Wave Farm and more regularly to improvise between Australia and the UK. Our live page can be found here.  Back in rehearsal/recording mode, we have just been exploring two new compositional propositions both exploring to an extent the potential of incorporating AI derived content into our telematic improvisations.

In other news and despite the typo on our name – our album “Shadowed” made number five in this month’s Rays Jazz at Foyles top ten list in Jazzwise magazine (the UK’s biggest selling jazz monthly and the leading English language jazz magazine in Europe). Neat!